Downtowns with more sun? Bring it on! 
SOURCE: NATIONALPOST.COM (March 15, 2015)

 

Architects claim ‘no shadow’ skyscraper will solve problem of tall buildings that block out the sun

David Barrett, The Telegraph
Sunday, Mar. 15, 2015

Architects have designed skyscrapers which "redirect sunlight to visibly reduce shadows at the base of the towers."

NBBJ
NBBJ Architects have designed skyscrapers which "redirect sunlight to visibly reduce shadows at the base of the towers."

London — Architects claim to have devised a “no shadow” skyscraper that may solve the problem of tall buildings blotting out the sun.
A London-based firm has produced designs for a pair of precisely aligned towers with curved and angled facades which reflect light down on to the street below. In theory, one of the towers would reflect sunlight into the shadow of its sister tower, reducing the area of shade caused by the project as a whole.

Skyscrapers often face problems securing planning permission because of their impact on the surrounding cityscape. One main objection is the impact they can have on the nearby environment, casting shadows that can stretch for half a mile or more at sunset.

The designs have been created by NBBJ, a worldwide architectural practice, which has developed buildings for Cambridge University, Google, Amazon and Microsoft.

A spokesman said: “The ‘No Shadow Tower’ redirects sunlight to visibly reduce shadows at the base of the towers by 60% over typical buildings, providing more daylight for pedestrians.”

Christian Coop, the NBBJ design director, said the project focused on “finding a way in which we can have the tall buildings we need without losing natural light on the areas below. The design ensures that the area between the towers is bright and pleasant, so is more likely to be used as a public space.”

NBBJ produced their theoretic designs for a site on the Greenwich Peninsula in southeast London, near the former Millennium Dome.

It would also aim to avoid a repeat of the damage caused by the Walkie Talkie building in London, in 2013, when its curved fascia concentrated sun rays on surrounding cars and buildings.

Dr. Philip Oldfield, of the University of Nottingham’s architecture department, said: “What’s great about the project is the focus on tall building form and shape, not only to look dramatic, but to contribute to creating a comfortable space at ground level.”

 

NBBJ
NBBJ Architects have designed skyscrapers which "redirect sunlight to visibly reduce shadows at the base of the towers."
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